Product has been added to the basket
Item has been added to bibliography

Janet Watson Meeting 2019: From core to atmosphere: Deep carbon

Date:
26 - 28 February 2019
Add to my calendar
Event type:
Conference
Organised by:
Geological Society Events, 2019 Year of Carbon
Venue:
Burlington House, London
Accessibility:
Event status:
EVENT CLOSED

Carbon is the element central to the evolution of life and maintenance of the Earth’s habitability. Though the presence of carbon at Earth’s surface is well known and vitally important, the majority of Earth’s carbon is thought to reside in the Deep Earth. Constraining the magnitudes of the fluxes to and from the Earth’s interior, and how they are controlled, is vital for understanding how the present-day Earth came to be and how it may develop in the future.

This three-day meeting brought together early career geoscientists and senior members of the Deep Carbon research community.

Presentations and discussions encompassed the latest advances in:

  • our understanding of the behaviour of carbon at the extreme pressures and temperatures of the Earth’s deep interior
  • the exchange of carbon between the near-surface and deep reservoirs
  • the abiotic development of organic compounds through deep time 
  • and the extreme limits of life on Earth. 

Senior scientists lead small mentoring group discussions about their research careers and experiences in academia.

 Conference themes

  • Deep Carbon origins, storage and transport
  • Carbon in the deep biosphere
  • Deep Carbon through time
  • The future of Deep Carbon research
  • Deep Carbon synthesis

The final day of the conference was dedicated to workshops addressing the future of Deep Carbon research and exploring the application of new software driven tools for understanding carbon in the Earth.

Schedule

Tuesday 26 February 2019

    08.30

    Registration & tea, coffee & refreshments

09.00

   Welcome – Lotta Purkamo (University of St. Andrews) and Simon Matthews (University of Cambridge)

Session I: Deep Carbon:

Storage and Origin

09.10

     KEYNOTE: The fate of carbonate in oceanic crust subducted into Earth’s mantle

     Andy Thomson, University College London

9.50

Carbon network evolution from dimers to sheets in ytrrium dicarbide

under pressure

Xiaolei Feng, Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR)

10.10

An Open-System Model for Coupled H2O and CO2 Transport in

Subducting Slabs

Tian Meng, University of Oxford

10.30

Carbon and Nitrogen in diamonds, meteorites and other mantle

samples : Need for a re-evaluation

Sudeshna Basgupta, University College London

10.50

    Breakout Session: Tea, coffee, refreshments and posters

11.20

Earth in five reactions

Simon Redfern, University of Cambridge

11.40

Helium isotopes reveal a mantle component for diamond with low

𝛿13C values

James Crosby, University of Cambridge

12.00

How much carbon is stored as diamond is in the East African

Lithosphere?

Adrian Jones, University College London

12.20

Carbon Mobility in 10+ km Deep Melts

John Parnell, University of Aberdeen

12.40

Lunch and Poster Session

13.15

ECR Workshop

14.30

Breakout Session: Tea, coffee, refreshments and posters

Session II:

Deep Carbon in the Biosphere

15.00

KEYNOTE: Life under pressure: Microbial response to hydraulic fracturing of the

deep terrestrial subsurface

Sophie Nixon, University of Manchester

15.40

Microbially mediated basalt alteration: an experimental approach

Rachel Moore, Université Paris Diderot

16.00

Depth and dissolved organic carbon shape microbial communities in

the deep biosphere

Mark Dopson, Linnaeus University

16.20

Science Communication

Storytelling and the Media: an Introduction to Science Communication

Katie Pratt, Communications Director, Deep Carbon Observatory, University of Rhode Island

17.00

    Drinks Reception and Posters

18.30

Close

Wednesday 27 February 2019

Session III:

Deep Carbon Transport

9.00

TBC

Ery Hughes, University of Bristol

9.40

High fluxes of deep volatiles at ocean island volcanoes: insights from

El Hierro, Canary Islands
Zoltan Taracsek, University of Manchester

10.00

Remobilization of crustal carbon may dominate volcanic arc emissions

Emily Mason, University of Cambridge

10.20

The extraction of carbon from the deep Earth’s mantle through

processes of redox melting and magma ascent

Vincenzo Stagno, Sapienza University of Rome

10.40

Modeling the transport of melt and volatiles by integrating

thermodynamic models in geodynamic simulations using the

community code ASPECT

Juliane Dannberg, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

11.00

     Breakout Session: Tea, coffee, refreshments and posters

11.20

   Constraining the distribution of sulfur between the Earth's mantle and

crust

   Callum Reekie, University of Cambridge

11.40

Composition of volatile components in garnet from a diamondiferous

eclogite of Udachnaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia, Russia

Nikolay Sobolev, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy of the Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences

12.00

Constraining the magmatic system of Ol Doinyo Lengai volcano by

monitoring CO2-H2O in gases

Kate Laxton, UCL

12.20

Lunch and Poster Session

12.45

ECR Workshop

Session IV:

Deep Carbon in Time

13.30

KEYNOTE: Linking massive emissions of deep carbon to major climate warming

events in the geological past

Lawrence Percival, Vrije Universiteit Brussels

14.10

Millenial storage of magmatic carbon near the Moho

Euan Mutch, University of Cambridge

14.30

Quantifying and understanding present-day volcanic carbon degassing at rifts: challenges and implications

Tamsin Mather, University of Oxford

15.00

Public Lecture

The Story of Earth: How Life, Rocks, and the Carbon Cycle have Co-Evolved

Robert Hazen

16.00

Breakout Session: Tea, coffee, refreshments and posters

16.20

The History of Deep Carbon Science, from Crust to Core

Simon Mitton, University of Cambridge

16.40

     Large Igneous Provinces and Environmental Change: Applying

Geographic Information Systems to Estimate Total Deccan Lava

Volumes

     Nick Barber, University of Cambridge

17.00

Quantifying the phosphorous inventory of the North American crust

Craig Walton, University of Cambridge

17.30

Close



 

 Keynote Speakers

  • Andy Thomson, UCL
  • Ery Hughes, University of Bristol
  • Lawerence Percival, Vrije Universiteit Brussels
  • Sophie Nixon, University of Manchester


 Bob Hazen Lecture

Wednesday 27 February 3pm

The Story of Earth: How Life, Rocks, and the Carbon Cycle have Co-Evolved 

The story of Earth is a 4.5-billion-year saga of dramatic transformations, driven by physical, chemical, and—based on a fascinating growing body of evidence—biological processes. The co-evolution of life and rocks, the emerging paradigm that frames this lecture, unfolds in an irreversible sequence of evolutionary stages.

Each stage re-sculpted our planet’s surface, while introducing new planetary processes and phenomena. The cycling of carbon played central roles as each stage inexorably paved the way for the next. This grand and intertwined tale of Earth’s living and non-living spheres is only now coming into focus.

Convenors

  • Simon Matthews (University of Cambridge)
  • Lotta Purkamo (University of St Andrews)

Registration rates

£ 150.00
£ 200.00
£ 150.00
£ 150.00
£ 50.00
£ 100.00

Geolsoc Contact

Registrations

Burlington House
Piccadilly
W1J 0BG


Conference Office

The Geological Society
Burlington House
Piccadilly
W1J 0BG