Product has been added to the basket

Biographies

Background of members of Council 2018/2019

Name Expertise Background
Mr Thomas Backhouse
Risk/Environmental and Geological Hazards
Industry
Mr Andrew Bloodworth
Economic Geology
Government
Mr John Booth
Engineering Geology
Industry
Dr Jason Canning
Petroleum Geology
Industry
Miss Liv Carroll
Mineral Exploration and Mining
Industry
Ms Lesley Dunlop
Geomorphology
Academe
Dr Sarah Gordon
Mining, Meteoritics, Risk
Industry
Mr Graham Goffey
Petroleum Geology
Industry
Prof James Griffiths
Engineering Geology
Academe
Dr Naomi Jordan
Sedimentology, Palaeontology, Palaeoenvironments
Academe
Prof Chris King
Geoscience Educator
Academe
Dr Robert Larter
Marine Geophysics
Government
Dr Colin North Sedimentology Academe 
Prof Bryne Ngwenya Microbial Geochemistry
Academe
Dr Sheila Peacock
Geophysics Government
Mr Nicholas Reynolds
Contaminated Land, Geotechnical Engineering
Industry
Prof Nick Rogers
Geochemistry
Academe
Dr Katherine Royse
Environmental Geology
Government
Mr Keith Seymour Hydrogeology
Retired
Miss Jessica Smith
Engineering Geology
Industry
Dr Helen Smyth
Petroleum Geology
Industry
Prof Robin Strachan
Tectonics, Geochronology
Academe
Mr John Talbot
Engineering Geology, Geotechnical Engineering
Retired
Dr Alexander Whittaker 
Tectonics and Landscape Dynamics
Academe


Brief biographies of members of Council 2018/2019

Mr Thomas Backhouse

Tom BackhouseTom is an entrepreneurial business owner and geologist, founder of Terrafirma, NetworkWith and Insight. After gaining a 1st in GeoSciences and beginning his career as a mining geologist in Cornwall, Tom founded Terrafirma. Terrafirma is a company focused on providing solutions to better understand, manage and resolve the risks the ground pose across the UK, winning an ‘Outstanding Achievement’ industry award in 2017.

Tom has provided over several hundred hours of Continuous Professional Development, training and education to professionals, public and academics and pursues a personal ambition to provide a platform for geoscientists to create, be free-thinking and to innovate, further benefiting the commercial and academic opportunities within Geoscience. He strongly believes in building better links between business, academia and student/graduate geoscientists, in order to better provide careers advice, prospects and networking opportunities. Tom is proud to act as a spokesperson on the council, able to voice new and innovative ideas, concerns and further enhance the capabilities of the Geological Society to support and benefit all members.

Back to topBack to Council


Mr Andrew Bloodworth

Andrew BloodworthAs BGS Science Director for Minerals and Waste, I am responsible for BGS activities related to mineral extraction and geological disposal of radioactive waste. Experience of these contentious uses of the subsurface has taught me that good decision-making requires independent, authoritative scientific information and advice. I believe that the Society has a major role to play by facilitating science debate in these areas. Using its unique status and considerable academic/ professional expertise, it should proactively inform policy makers and civil society on geoscience-related topics, including those seen as controversial.

I have been a Fellow since the early 1990s and a Chartered Geologist since 1996. For the last decade I have been a scrutineer for Chartership applications and have mentored a number of applicants. I have also served on the Society’s Chartership Appeals Panel. I strongly believe in a robust and transparent process for our Chartership candidates, and in the value of Chartership in the individual and collective development of our profession. Elsewhere, I am an Associate Member of the Royal Town Planning Institute and a founder member of the UK Minerals Forum. I represent BGS at the Confederation of British Industry Minerals Group and the Mineral Resources Expert Group of EuroGeosurveys.

Back to topBack to Council

John Booth

John BoothI am Managing Director of Geotechnics Limited, one of the UK’s largest independent geotechnical investigation specialists. I have 35 years’ experience of engineering geology in the UK and overseas. I hold a BSc in Geology (University of Liverpool, 1983), and an MSc in Engineering Geology (University of Leeds, 1991). I have been a Fellow of the Society and a Chartered Geologist since 1991, and a Chartered Scientist since 2005. I am a UK Registered Ground Engineering Adviser (RoGEP).

I have been committed to the Society and the wider geoscience community throughout my career. I am a former member of the Committee for the NW Regional Group (1993-96), and am an active CGeol Scrutineer. I have been involved in promoting career opportunities at schools and universities, and in mentoring colleagues as they approach Chartership.

Engineering geology has a large role to play in developing our communities for the future, and is the direct link between the natural and the built environment. The availability and management of resources, water and energy, together with greater awareness of natural processes, floods and climate change are fundamental to safeguarding our World. An understanding of Geology and how we use and husband these vital reserves underpins the improvements we need in infrastructure, building our cities, and delivering improvements in health, education and wellbeing for an ever expanding population.

Back to topBack to Council

Jason Canning

Jason Canning_council

I am currently an Exploration Manager at Sound Energy, a North African and European focused, upstream oil and gas company. Prior to this I was Chief Geologist at BG Group. I have been working in the Petroleum Industry for 20 years. I have been a fellow of the Society since 1999 and a Chartered Geologist since 2015. I completed a BSc at Oxford Brookes (1993) and a have PhD from the University of Birmingham (1997).

I am standing for Council to impact our Society in two ways. First, I think our Society can play a stronger role in supporting the Geoscience profession. Low commodity prices mean that those members of our society who work in extractive industries face increased uncertainty and perhaps periods of unemployment. One way we can help, is to encourage Fellows to get more out of their Continuing Professional Development (CPD) records. Recording of CPD activity is an important way of documenting our skills, capabilities and experience. I want to share my experience of managing such schemes in industry.

Secondly, I want to improve links between industry and academia. Specifically, I think I can share my own experiences to help the Society to encourage sharing of data between industry and researchers, with the aim of the Society becoming the forum for more regular interaction between the two. I also believe the Society can help to steer taught courses to deliver more of what industry requires.

I think focusing on these two areas will help the Geological Society to be a more inclusive, collaborative and supportive Society.

Back to topBack to Council

Lesley Dunlop

Lesley DunlopI graduated from Durham University with a BSc Geology in 1985 and obtained an MSc in Crystallography from the London University in 1988. I have been a Fellow of the Society since 2006 and serve on the Geoconservation Committee. I work at Northumbria University and research interests relate to periglacial geomorphology using mainly geophysical techniques.

As Chair of the English Geodiversity Forum I was involved in the production and launch of the Geodiversity Charter for England. The Charter and Forum are aimed at highlighting the importance of geodiversity with the public, industry, government and professional organisations etc. I am Vice Chair of the Northern Group of the Geological Society and a Member of the Executive Committee of ProGeo, the European Association for the Conservation of Geoheritage.

I have an interest in outreach, education and public information and have taught at Northumbria and other Universities, tutored A-Level and adult geology classes, including leading field visits. I have worked with organisations including the Natural History Museum, The Great North Museum, Geographical Association and GeoConservationUK. I believe that I can bring a wide depth of interests and knowledge to Council and I am committed to enhancing the role of the Society.

Back to topBack to Council

Graham Goffey

Graham Goffey

Having spent 32 years in the petroleum industry I now provide expert consulting services to a range of clients in and connected to the petroleum industry as well as working on various natural resource-related initiatives of my own’. My qualifications are BSc Geological Sciences (Birmingham), MSc Petroleum Geology (Imperial College) and MBA (Warwick).

I have been a Society Fellow for most of my career.  From 2004 – 2010 I served on the committee of the Petroleum Group, including three years as Chairman.  During this period I convened many Petroleum Group workshops and conferences. I lead the NW Europe section of the PGC VII conference in 2009, and co-edited GS Special Publications 254 (The Deliberate Search for the Stratigraphic Trap) and 348 (Hydrocarbons in Contractional Belts).

Back to topBack to Council

Sarah Gordon

Sarah Gordon_council

An understanding of geology is a critical component of many decisions; whether environmental, business, or societal. I’m lucky enough to work in both industry and academia, specialising in making geology exciting and accessible to decision makers. I would be honoured to do this on behalf of the Geological Society.

I’m currently the Managing Director of the risk management consultancy Satarla. Satarla works with clients from all industries, from mining and energy, to utilities, charities and finance. I’m also an Honorary Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Earth Science and Engineering at Imperial College London. Prior to this I worked with the mining company Anglo American, in both the exploration and safety & sustainability teams. This broad background, coupled with my PhD in meteoritics, allows me to explore many aspects of the geological discipline.

I’ve been a Fellow of the Society for over 10 years; I also work with the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Network; the Institute of Risk Management; and was named as one of the 100 Global Inspirational Women in Mining 2015. I provide training and advice on behalf of these organisations and welcome the opportunity to make a contribution through the Council of the Geological Society. I was honoured to be elected Secretary Foreign & External Affairs in June 2017.

Back to topBack to Council

Prof James Griffiths

James GriffithsA Fellow of 38 years standing, and having worked in industry and academia in a variety of roles including secondary school teacher, Head of Geology and Dean of Research at Plymouth University and as a Director-level industrial engineering geologist, my focus will be on endorsing the aspirations of professional geologists through chartership and RoGEP, promoting university degree recognition by the Society, and supporting geology as a career choice. I also believe the Society has an important role in influencing Government policy on a host of environmental and development issues.

I am a Chartered Geologist and was awarded the Glossop Medal in 2013. Finally, I want to uphold the Society in maintaining its outstanding record for world class scientific publications. I have served on various Society committees:- Books Editorial Committee (since 2000); QJEGH Board (various periods since 2001); Chair of the Engineering Group 2006-8 (committee member 1997-2008); Science Committee (2006-8); Southwest Regional Group Committee (1994-2002).

Back to topBack to Council

Naomi Jordan

Naomi Jordan_council

Geoscience is the meeting point between all of the sciences, engineering and art. It plays a larger role in our everyday lives than most people imagine, with mineral resources essential for our electronic devices, water flow and bedrock interaction controlling both flooding and water shortages, and an understanding of the rocks beneath our feet necessary for any building project; these are in addition to energy resources and natural hazards. The Geological Society, therefore, has an important role to play in our modern, ever-changing world.

As a Council Member I aim to improve and develop the Society for existing and future members, helping to ensure its future and maintain its relevance; I also have a particular interest in outreach and education. Whilst completing my PhD in Lower Jurassic palaeoenvironments at Imperial College London (2011-2016), and my undergraduate in Geological Science at the University of Leeds (2007-2011), I have taught hands-on science in an inner-city London primary school, tutored A-Level and undergraduate geology students and taught an adult geology class. I have also worked with a range of organisations designing and implementing outreach activities, including the Natural History Museum, Science Museum, British Geological Survey, Leeds Museum Services, RockWatch, Lyme Regis Fossil Festival and with both universities.

Whilst a Council Member I will be serving on both the External Relations Committee and Education sub-committee, with the aim of raising the profile of both Earth Sciences and the Society within the profession and to the general public.

Prof Chris King

Chris KingEver since leaving diamond prospecting in the 1970s, I have been trying to bring the fascination of geology to a wider audience, first as a geology teacher, then as a geology teacher trainer, then by leading the Earth Science Education Unit offering professional development to thousands of teachers across the UK, and now as Emeritus Professor of Earth Science Education at Keele University. By being a member of Council, I hope to carry this message forward, whilst contributing to the educational impact of the Society.

I have flown the flag internationally, by leading the development of the International Geoscience Education Organisation and currently by chairing the IUGS Commission on Geoscience Education and the EGU Committee on Education. Nationally, I work with the Earth Science Teachers’ Association and the WJEC exam board. I have chaired the Society’s Education Committee in the past and been a member of the more recent iteration of the Education Committee as well. I currently chair the Earth Science Education Forum, bringing together representatives of organisations interested in geoscience education across the country.

Back to topBack to Council

Robert Larter

Robert Larter_council

The Geological Society has an important role in today’s world in communicating the societal relevance of our science, championing public funding for it, delivering impartial advice, and offering professional accreditation.

I am a marine geophysicist at the British Antarctic Survey (BAS). After graduating in Geology from Durham University, I gained an MSc in Petroleum Exploration Studies from the University of Aberdeen. I then worked as a Research Associate at the University of Birmingham for several years while studying for my PhD in marine geophysics on a part-time basis. 

During 28 years at BAS I have managed a range of science projects in fields ranging from subducting margins to ice sheet history and dynamics. I have led eight research cruises and mentored many early career scientists and students. I believe more can be done to involve students and early career scientists in the Society, and that this is crucial to its long-term future.

I have been a Fellow since 1998 and was Secretary and Treasurer of the Marine Studies Group from 1999 to 2004. I was a member of the working group that developed the Society’s statement on climate change in 2010, and the addendum to it in 2013.

Back to topBack to Council

Colin North

Colin North

Through its publications, the Geological Society has long led the world in communicating, and thus stimulating, the science of Geology. The world of publishing is changing rapidly, driven by innovative technology and new ways of sharing and evaluating our science, meaning we must not become complacent. Change needs to be assessed carefully yet embraced positively: the message remains more important than the delivery mechanism. As a Fellow of the Society for over 30 years, of which I have been Chartered for over 20, working in the petroleum industry with BP and in university teaching and research, currently at University of Aberdeen, I have admired the successful way this activity has been managed sustainably thus far.

As Publications Secretary, my role is to help our Society navigate the new challenges by applying my wide-ranging publishing knowledge and experience built up with other international organizations. This includes: Chair of the GeoScienceWorld electronic publishing aggregate board of directors; Journal of Sedimentary Research editor and SEPM Council member; AAPG publications committee Chair and Elected Editor candidate; book editor; and article author and reviewer. Above all is the need to protect the high standard of our Society’s science while fostering collaboration: quantity should never trump quality.

Back to topBack to Council

Prof Bryne Ngwenya

Bryne NgwenyaI have been a Fellow of the Society since 2002 and while my activities in that time have focused on academic research, my passion is to see this research translated into practice in order to further the aims of the Society. By serving on Council, I hope to promote and support policies that encourage closer collaboration between practitioners and academics, and use the Environment Network, of which I am Convenor-designate, as a vehicle for hosting events that enable this close collaboration.

I am a Reader in Microbial Geochemistry at the University of Edinburgh. I am also currently Head of the Earth & Planetary Sciences Research Institute, one of three institutes that make up the School of Geosciences.

I am currently not a member of any specialist group, but have a network of former students who work in the commercial-environmental and mining sectors, which informs my research. Qualifications: BSc Geochemistry (Reading, 1987), PhD Geochemistry (Reading 1992).

Back to topBack to Council

Sheila Peacock

Sheila Peacock_council

I believe every professional needs a respected society that represents its members and their science. I want to promote engagement with decision makers, particularly politicians, explaining the world around us in terms of earth science, to ensure they understand the consequences of their decisions for geoscientists, users of geoscience and the future of the environment.

I am currently employed with a Ministry of Defence contractor supporting seismological monitoring of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, having been a lecturer at the University of Birmingham (Applied Geophysics MSc 1991-2002), computer officer/administrator (2002-4), and supported professional accreditation of the University's Computer Science courses.  I was a research fellow at the University of Reading (1987-1991), BSc Geophysics (Newcastle 1983), PhD (Edinburgh 1987), and CPhys MInstP.  

I joined the Geological Society in 1990. I am on the committee of the British Geophysical Association (1998-present), as secretary (2007-9), and representative on the committee for the Geological Society bicentennial conference (2006-7). I was on the Council of the Royal Astronomical Society (2013-15), the committee of AUT (now UCU) of Birmingham University local association (1998-2005; honorary secretary 2000-2002), and now am workplace health, safety and environment rep in Prospect.

Back to topBack to Council

Nicholas Reynolds

Nik Reynolds_council

I am a Senior Geo-environmental and Geotechnical engineer at a small consultancy in Chester and have been employed at this company for over 17 years.  I have been a Fellow of the Geological Society from being an Undergraduate at Aberystwyth University, graduated with a Master’s degree from Cardiff University, and became a Chartered Geologist in 2009. I later became a Chartered Scientist in 2011.

I was elected the Secretary of the Northwest Regional Group in 2012 and have been responsible for organising the lecture programme, fieldtrips and annual newsletters for the region.  Within the lecture programme, I have brought the Geological Society and the regional Geology Association groups together for annual lectures.  I have developed and introduced a conference for A-level students which was organised in conjunction with Manchester University and ESTA, which involved lecturers from across the region presenting revision lectures on difficult syllabus subjects.

I am very keen to serve on Council to both increase the profile of practicing environmental and geotechnical consultants within the Society.  I am also very keen to improve regional support, and bring the Society to A-Level and Undergraduate students, as well as external organisations who explore the outdoors such as Scouts and Guides.

Back to topBack to Council

Nick Rogers

Nick Rogers I am Emeritus Professor of Earth Sciences at the Open University where I have spent virtually all my career. My research interests are in high temperature geochemistry, igneous petrology and the composition and evolution of the mantle, but I have also engaged with many aspects of higher education that relate to the mission of the OU. I have been Head of Department and Science Programme Director, serving at Deanery Executive level in both posts.

I have been a Fellow of the Society for over 20 years and served on Council for six. For five years I was Publications Secretary in the run-up to and through the Bicentenary and was heavily involved in the establishment of Geoscience World and the Lyell Collection which are now core to the Society’s publication output and a major source of income. I have subsequently served as a member, and latterly chair of the Education Committee, during which time we have successfully engaged with school curriculum consultations, developed the careers portal and facilitated the establishment of University Geoscience UK.

Having been involved with the development and drafting of the 2007 strategy, I am keen to see the renewed strategy established. The Society plays a key role in bridging the gaps between geoscience professions and education, research and policy, and should be a leading and authoritative voice for our science. I bring to the role of President a sound knowledge of how the Society and its staff work and an enthusiasm to ensure that its role continues to develop along the lines it has been following for the past decade.

Back to topBack to Council

Katherine Royse

Katherine Royse

I have worked at BGS for 19 years and I am currently the Science Director for GeoAnalytics and Modelling. I focus on taking a multidisciplinary approach to modelling the environment to better understand and predict the Earth’s response to environmental change (publishing over 30 key

 papers). I feel that I have a lot to offer the Society through my professional career at BGS where I have successfully led Urban Geoscience (publishing over 30 key papers) and Derived Products, as well as several large European projects.

I am a member of the NERC Innovation Advisory Board where I have developed their new innovation strategy. I have a strong background in knowledge exchange and stakeholder engagement having completed a NERC KE Fellowship in probability, uncertainty and risk in the environment working to translate natural hazard research to the financial service sector. I am a STEM ambassador, and associate editor of the Geoscience Data journal and German Journal of Geoscience.

I have been a Fellow of the Society since 1997, CGeol, 2001 and EurGeol in 2002 and have been a chartered scrutineer since 2009. As a senior member of BGS I am closely linked with the academic and private sector Earth Science community. During my tenure on Council I would like to focus on increasing the Society’s relevance to all Earth Scientists particularly in developing their future professional roles through ongoing learning (CPD).

As Professional Secretary, I will utilise my skills and networks to assist in bridging the gap between academia and industry as well as in raising awareness of the activities of the Society and the importance of the Society to our professional standing and development.

Back to topBack to Council

Keith Seymour

Kevin Seymour_Council

I was privileged to be elected to Council in 2014, having just taken early retirement from the Environment Agency. I saw this as an opportunity give something back to the Society and profession.  My particular interest is in promoting chartership and professionalism amongst our practising geoscience community I sit on the Professional Committee and have helped coordinate our national careers events for students and industry.
I am honoured to now be taking on the role of Vice President for Regional Groups since they are the lifeblood of the Society across the country (and overseas).

Most of my 38 year working career was spent in the North West of England. I started out as an engineering geologist with the former North West Water Authority before moving into hydrogeology, managing and protecting groundwater resources in the NW. In the early days of the National Rivers Authority I was instrumental in introducing geotechnical engineering standards to the landfill industry.
In 2008 I took up a national technical leadership role in the Environment Agency, a key part of which was to support and develop my geoscience colleagues across the country. Throughout my career, it’s been the application of my geological and geoscience skills to understanding and finding pragmatic solutions to environmental issues that’s been so rewarding.

Underpinning this has been recognised as a professional geoscientist. I’ve been a Fellow of the Society since graduating from Newcastle University in 1976 with a degree in Applied (Engineering) Geology. I was a member of the former Institution of Geologists and sat on the Committee of the North West regional group for a number of years. I was proud to become a Chartered Geologist back in 1990.

Back to topBack to Council

Jessica Smith

Jessica SmithAs the Secretary of the Central Scotland Regional Group (CSRG) my key motivation for joining Council is to bring the voice of the Regions to the table. I believe that geographical diversity plays a role in ensuring that the Society remains relevant to the membership and can have a positive influence on the engagement of Fellows.

I joined the Geological Society as a Candidate Fellow while studying my BSc in Earth Sciences at the University of Glasgow; upon graduating in 2004 I became a Fellow. Thereafter, the practical experience gained in work combined with my MSc in Engineering Geology at Imperial College London culminated in my obtaining Chartered Geologist status in 2014. Supporting and enabling others to achieve this career landmark is something I take great pride in through my work activities as well as my involvement with the CSRG.

In my current role as a Senior Engineering Geologist with Atkins I am privileged to be in a position where I can promote STEM careers to young people, and particularly to young women. It will be a great honour to continue do so as a member of Council with the Geological Society.

Back to topBack to Council

Dr Helen Smyth

Helen SmythI am a Geoscience Advisor at Neftex Insights part of Halliburton-Landmark. In addition to sitting on the Neftex Insights management team, I am responsible for Landmark’s university outreach programs globally and through this role seek to build closer ties between academia and industry. I serve on the Petroleum Geoscience Advisory Board at both Royal Holloway and Imperial College London.

A field geologist by background, I have undertaken numerous expeditions in Indonesia and the Canadian Arctic. Source-to-Sink investigations were the focus of much of much of my early research career following PhD and Post-Doc at Royal Holloway and subsequent geologist role at CASP.

I served on the Petroleum Group Committee of the Geological Society between 2010 and 2016, and held the role of Publications Secretary, and through this role co-convened four conferences and edited two Geological Society Special Publications.

Back to topBack to Council

Prof Robin Strachan

Rob StrachanI am passionate about developing the role and importance of the Geological Society as the pre-eminent face of geosciences in the UK. I am currently Professor of Geology in the School of Earth & Environmental Sciences at the University of Portsmouth, recently having stepped down after 10 years as Head of School. I have been a Fellow of the Society since 1983 and a Chartered Geologist. I served on the Editorial Board of the Journal of the Geological Society 1997-2005 and was then Chief Editor 2005-2011.

I was awarded a Coke Medal in 2012. Since 2012, I have served on the Books Editorial Committee as one of the Society’s Books Editors. In January 2018 I commence a four-year term as an Editor of the Geological Society of America Bulletin. I have a particular knowledge of, and interest in, scientific publishing as a result of my extensive editorial experience supporting and managing the Society’s flagship journal, and assisting in the development of Special Publications (co-editing three) and Memoirs. This experience coupled with my international contacts means that I will be able to serve Council and the Society very effectively.

Back to topBack to Council

John Talbot

John TalbotA lifelong passion for geology and engineering geology was instilled in me as an undergraduate, by the infectious enthusiasm of both Professors Bill Dearman and Duncan Murchison. My first move on graduating was to seek Fellowship of the Society in 1970-71. Since then I gained an MSc in Geotechnical Engineering in 1981, followed by Chartered Geologist, Engineer, Environmentalist and Scientist. I am also a European Geologist and Engineer, and a Fellow of the Institution of Civil Engineers.

My pre-retirement career was predominantly focused in geotechnical engineering and engineering geology, when I provided technical and financial project management and advice to a wide client base; in both the public and private sectors. I have technical expertise in all geotechnical aspects of site investigations; the analysis, design and provision of advice on shallow and deep foundations, maritime and inland waterfront structures, highways, the stability of rock and soil slopes, and earth dams in the UK, Europe, Africa and SE Asia.

I have been a Chartership scrutineer for over 20 years, and a reviewer and auditor for Chartered Geologist applications more recently. Although I am currently Chairman of the Professional Accreditation Committee on behalf of the Society’s Professional Committee, and was primarily responsible for the recent comprehensive review of our CPD recording system on behalf of the Chartership Committee, I hope to have the opportunity to make an even greater contribution to the affairs of the Society, particularly in the areas of Chartership, CPD and governance. I have been a member of the Society’s Chartership Committee since 2016 and am its newly appointed chairman.

Back to topBack to Council

Alexander Whittaker

Alex Whittaker_council

I am a senior lecturer at Imperial College London. My research combines field, remote sensing and numerical modelling approaches to address how tectonics and climate drive landscape evolution over a range of scales. At Imperial I lecture structural geology and tectonics, and I co-ordinate the department’s field programme, leading excursions to the Spanish Pyrenees and the Apennines.

I read Natural Sciences at the University of Cambridge between 1998 and 2002, before moving to Edinburgh University to do a PhD in landscape dynamics and neo-tectonics. Following an Entente Cordiale Fellowship at Université Joseph Fourier, France, I moved to Imperial College London.  I was appointed a Lecturer in 2010 and Senior Lecturer in 2014.  I have been a fellow of the Society for seven years and I received the President’s Award in 2009.  I have subsequently served the Society in a range of roles; currently I sit on the research grants and Society awards committees. As a member of Council I will also serve on the Science committee.

The geosciences are central to addressing many of the problems that we and the planet face in the coming years and the Society has a vital role to play in leading these discussions and linking research with both policy and practical applications.  I am passionate about making our membership as diverse as possible and I am keen to promote engagement with the wider public and policy makers who need to know why our discipline matters.

Back to topBack to Council


Sa
Save
Save
Save
Save
Save
Save
Council

Find out about the Society's elected Council members