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Scottish Journal of Geology

Although published only since 1965, the Scottish Journal of Geology has a long pedigree. It is the joint publication of the Geological Society of Glasgow and the Edinburgh Geological Society, which prior to 1965 published separate Transactions: from 1860 in the case of Glasgow and 1863 for Edinburgh.

The Scottish Journal of Geology (SJG) is available online via the Lyell Collection. Please see subscription rates for access entitlements.

Traditionally, the Journal has acted as the focus for papers on all aspects of Scottish geology and its contiguous areas, including the surrounding seas. The publication policy has always been outward looking, with the Editors encouraging review papers and papers on broader aspects of the earth sciences that cannot be discussed solely in terms of Scottish geology.

The diverse geology of Scotland continues to provide an important natural laboratory for the study of earth sciences; many seminal studies in geology have been carried out on Scottish rocks, and over the years the results of much of this work had been published in the Journal and its predecessors.

The Journal fully deserves its high reputation worldwide and intends to maintain its status in the front rank of publications in the earth sciences.

The Journal is abstracted and/or indexed in:

  • Current Contents
  • Science Citation Index
  • GeoArchive, Geobase
  • Petroleum Abstracts
  • Geological Abstracts
  • Mineralogical Abstracts
  • IBZ/IBR
Recent Highlights:

A sauropod-dominated tracksite from Rubha nam Brathairean (Brothers’ Point), Isle of Skye, Scotland

By Paige E. dePolo, Stephen L. Brusatte, Thomas J. Challands, Davide Foffa, Dugald A. Ross, Mark Wilkinson and Hong-yu Yi

Middle Jurassic dinosaur fossils are exceedingly rare, but new discoveries from the Isle of Skye, Scotland, are beginning to fill this gap. We here describe a new dinosaur tracksite found in the Lealt Shale Formation (Bathonian) of the Great Estuarine Group at Rubha nam Brathairean (Brothers' Point) on Skye. The site preserves an abundance of small sauropod manus and pes prints and several isolated and broken medium-to-large tridactyl footprints. The main site occurs on a single horizon of shaley limestone that formed in a lagoonal environment. The sauropod tracks are tentatively assigned to the ichnotaxon Breviparopusdue to the narrow gauge of the trackways, the digital characteristics of the pes, and the ratio of heteropody observed between the manus and the pes. A theropod trackmaker is inferred for some of the tridactyl impressions with several indicative of the ichnotaxon Eubrontes. This new site strengthens the inference, originally based on a previously discovered locality near Duntulm Castle (Duntulm Formation) in northern Skye, that sauropods habitually spent time in lagoons during the Middle Jurassic.

Read the full paper in the Lyell Collection

Multi-stage pyrite genesis and epigenetic selenium enrichment of Greenburn coals (East Ayrshire)

By Liam A. Bullock, John Parnell, Magali Perez, Adrian Boyce, Joerg Feldmann and Joseph G.T. Armstrong

Carboniferous coals of the Ayrshire Coalfield are enriched in selenium (Se) relative to average UK and world compositions, substituting for sulphur in pyrite. Greenburn surface mine coals are characterized by syngenetic concretionary pyrite (c. 15% total area), occurring as bedding-parallel banding, and later-formed (epigenetic) cross-cutting pyrite in cleats (c. 9% total area). In these, sulphur isotope compositions for both syngenetic and epigenetic pyrite include isotopically light and heavy variants, suggesting diagenetic and hydrothermal fluid formation. Late/post-Visean cleat-filling pyrite is enriched in Se (up to 266 ppm) compared to the earlier-formed material (Se up to 181 ppm).

Anomalous Se may have been sourced from near-by sulphidic Dalradian metamorphic rocks. Initial Se sequestration is associated with syngenetic pyrite mineralization, absorbed from seawater and pore waters, with additional Se introduced from fluids mobilized during epigenetic pyrite formation. Cleats from local brittle fracturing provided channels for fluid flow and a locus for precipitation of comparatively high-Se pyrite. Permian dolerite intrusions may have provided an enrichment source and/or fluid distribution mechanism. The Se concentrations of the Greenburn coals relate to multi-stage mineralization, with cleat-filling pyrite showing the highest Se content, and highlight the potential for high Se in similarly altered and fractured coal deposits worldwide.

Read the full paper in the Lyell Collection

SJG Online

The Lyell Collection

Access the Scottish Journal of Geology (SJG) in the Lyell Collection

Journal Metrics

  • Impact Factor: 0.897
  • 5yr IF: 0.859
  • SJR: 0.536
  • SNIP: 0.610

Information on Metrics