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Masters Level Degree information for CGeol and CSci

The Geological Society requires candidates for CGeol to hold a recognised degree at Masters level (M-level); or to have post-graduation experience to demonstrate M-level attainment. See CGeol details

The Science Council requires candidates for CSci to hold a recognised degree at Masters level (M-level); or to have post-graduation experience to demonstrate M-level attainment. See CSci details


Chartered Geologist

Knowledge and understanding are important components of professional competence. 

Formal education is the usual, although not the only, way of demonstrating the necessary knowledge and understanding, and the following Master’s-level qualifications exemplify the required knowledge and understanding for Chartered Geologists. 

The Geological Society requires candidates for CGeol to hold a recognised degree at M-level; or to have post-graduation experience to demonstrate M-level attainment. 

M-level degrees include not only the 1-year vocational MSc degrees but also the Integrated Masters degrees (MGeol, MSci, MESci, etc). 

Applicants who only have a Bachelor's level degree, are required to demonstrate that they have accumulated the same level of academic knowledge and understanding as Applicants who hold further qualifications. 

Applicants can demonstrate this by:

  • Further learning or 

  • Experiential learning (Work experience)

Further learning means gaining further qualifications, either in whole or in part, and could be an MSc programme or other selected modules or units that may be sufficient to top up their qualifications to the required standard. Experiential learning is learning that has been acquired through a range of unstructured experience as well as structured learning that has been gained in the workplace rather than formal educational programmes. 

Any additional academic qualifications that have been achieved are also relevant in demonstrating geoscientific knowledge and understanding.

Experiential learning may be shown by the submission of a report of approximately 2000 words demonstrating how their learning meets M-level equivalence. Reports longer than 2000 words will be returned for editing. 

The report must show that the Applicant has undertaken technical geoscience work at a level equivalent to, or higher than, that of an MSc dissertation. 

An appropriate Supporting Document may be nominated to demonstrate Master’s level equivalence.

This report must represent the Applicants own work, and the Society reserves the right to make enquiries as to authenticity. 

Where the work reported has been carried out as part of a team, the Applicant's contributions must be clearly highlighted and due acknowledgement given to the work of other team members.

A good example of a Master’s Equivalence Report would be project reports produced in the final year of a four-year integrated Master’s degree, or a one-year MSc programme. This does not need to be a thesis.

Other examples may include:

  • Investigation and reporting of a project/problem in any area of Geoscience 
  • A piece of academic research published in a peer reviewed journal 
  • An internal technical report 
  • Design and analysis of a survey of, eg, contaminated land with recommendations and conclusions 
  • An assessment of a landfill site and its possible impact on adjacent groundwater systems or gas generation 
  • Environmental impact assessment that contains a significant geoscience component 
  • A geophysical survey, including interpretation 
  • A modelling-based investigation of a geological, geophysical or geochemical phenomenon

NB -This list is not exhaustive or prescriptive.

Any project report should include:

  • A clear description of the aims of the project; 
  • A description of how the project was carried out; 
  • An outline of the results achieved and their interpretation; 
  • An evaluation of the project in terms of the skills and knowledge developed in order to complete the project.

The report will be assessed for Masters Equivalence by Scrutineers who will be appointed by the Chartership Officer and who will also assess the overall application for CGeol. These Scrutineers will be selected for their knowledge of the subject area of expertise/competence claimed by the Applicant.

Assessment of Equivalence will be made solely on the Report submitted.

If an application for CGeol is unsuccessful then a new submission may be made at any time, without prejudice.


Chartered Scientist

The Science Council requires candidates for CSci to hold a recognised degree at M-level; or to have post-graduation experience to demonstrate M-level attainment.

M-level degrees include not only the 1-year vocational MSc degrees but also the Integrated Masters degrees (MGeol, MSci, MESci, etc).

Applicants who only have a Bachelor's level degree, may submit a report of approximately 2000 words to demonstrate M-level equivalence. Reports longer than 2000 words will be returned for editing.

The report must show that the applicant has undertaken technical geoscience work at a level equivalent to, or higher than, that of an MSc dissertation. The use of past reports, written as part of the applicant's work and professional development, is encouraged ie, the Applicant submits a report that demonstrates Master’s level equivalent. Re-writing of reports is not required.

The report must represent the Applicants own work, and the Society reserves the right to make enquiries as to authenticity. 

Where the work reported has been carried out as part of a team, the applicant's contribution must be clearly highlighted and due acknowledgement given to the work of other team members.

A good example of a Master’s Equivalence Report would be project reports produced in the final year of a four-year integrated Master’s degree, or a one-year MSc programme. This does not need to be a thesis.

Other examples may include:

  • Investigation and reporting of a project/problem in any area of Geoscience 
  • A piece of academic research published in a peer reviewed journal 
  • Art internal technical report 
  • Design and analysis of a survey of, eg, contaminated land with recommendations and conclusions 
  • An assessment of a landfill site and its possible impact on adjacent groundwater systems or gas generation 
  • Flood risk assessments 
  • Environmental impact assessment that contains a significant geological component 
  • A geophysical survey, including interpretation 
  • A modelling-based investigation of a geological, geophysical or geochemical phenomenon 
  • An investigation of the palaeontology of a particular taxon, in terms of its evolutionary history or stratigraphic occurrence

NB -This list is not exhaustive or prescriptive.

Any project report should include:

  • A clear description of the aims of the project 
  • A description of how the project was carried out
  • An outline of the results achieved and their interpretation
  • An evaluation of the project in terms of the skills and knowledge developed in order to complete the project.

The report will be assessed for Masters Equivalence by scrutineers who will be appointed by the Chartership Officer and who will also assess the overall application for CSci. These scrutineers will be selected for their knowledge of the subject area of expertise/competence claimed by the Applicant.

Assessment of Equivalence will be made solely on the Report submitted.

Reports will be kept by the Society but will remain confidential.

If an application for CSci is unsuccessful then a new submission may be made at any time, without prejudice.