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Bibliography

Plate 1, Beauties of Lyme
Lyme Regis depicted in 1855, from R Brown, 'The Beauties of Lyme Regis, Charmouth, the Land-slip, &c', (1858). GSL Library collections.

Acknowledgements

Many thanks to Tom Sharpe and Mike A Taylor who generously provided advice and shared their research and publications on Mary Anning.  The exhibition only touches on a specific area of Anning’s life, but if you want to find out more Tom’s biography The Fossil Woman. A life of Mary Anning (2020) is highly recommended.  Just a small number of Mike Taylor’s articles are referenced below. 

Selected bibliography

  1. Anning, M “On the supposed frontal spine of the genus Hybodus”, Magazine of Natural History, New Series, vol 3 (1839), p605.
  2. Baigent, Elizabeth, “Bullock, William”, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 3 October 2013. 
  3. Bork, Kennard B, “Natural theology in the eighteenth century, as exemplified in the writings of Élie Bertrand (1713–1797), a Swiss naturalist and Protestant pastor”, Geological Society, London, Special Publications, vol 310 (2009), pp277-288. 
  4. Broderip, W J, “Description of some Fossil Crustacea and Radiata, found at Lyme Regis, in Dorsetshire”, Transactions of the Geological Society of London, Series 2, vol 5 (1837), pp171-174.
  5. Brown, R, ‘The beauties of Lyme Regis, Charmouth, the Land-slip, &c’, 2nd edn., enlarged and revised London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans (1858). 
  6. Buckland, W, “On the Excavation of Valleys by diluvian Action, as illustrated by a succession of Valleys which intersect the South Coast of Dorset and Devon”, Transactions of the Geological Society of London, Series 2, vol 1 (1822), pp95-102. 
  7. Buckland, W, "On the Cycadeoideæ, a Family of Fossil Plants found in the Oolite Quarries of the Isle of Portland", Transactions of the Geological Society of London, Series 2, vol 2 (1828), pp395-401. 
  8. Buckland, W, “On the discovery of a new species of Pterodactyle; and also of Faeces of the Ichthyosaurus; and of a black substance resembling Sepia in the Lias at Lyme Regis” [1829], Proceedings of the Geological Society of London, vol 1 (1834), pp 96-98, 142-143. 
  9. Buckland, W "On the Discovery of a New Species of Pterodactyle in the Lias at Lyme Regis", Transactions of the Geological Society of London, Series 2, vol 3 (1829), pp217-222. 
  10. Buckland, W, "On the Discovery of Coprolites, or Fossil Fæces, in the Lias at Lyme Regis, and in other Formations", Transactions of the Geological Society of London, Series 2, vol 3 (1829), pp223-236. 
  11. Buckland, W, Geology and mineralogy considered with reference to natural theology. London: William Pickering (1836). (The Bridgewater treatises on the power, wisdom, and goodness of God, as manifested in the creation, 6). 
  12. Charlesworth, E, “On the Fossil Remains of a Species of Hybodus, from Lyme Regis”, Magazine of Natural History, New Series, vol 3 (1839), pp242-248.
  13. Coley, N G, “Everard Home”, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 27 May 2010. 
  14. Conybeare, W D, "Additional Notices on the Fossil Genera Ichthyosaurus and Plesiosaurus.”, Transactions of the Geological Society of London, Series 2, vol 1 (1822), pp103-123. 
  15. Conybeare, W D, “On the Discovery of an almost perfect Skeleton of the Plesiosaurus”, Transactions of the Geological Society of London, Series 2, vol 1 (1824), pp381-389. 
  16. Conybeare, W D, “Essay introductory to geology”, West of England Jl Sci Lit, vol 1 1835), pp1-19.  
  17. Conybeare, W D, “Essay on geology, with especial reference to the geological advantages of Bristol”, West of England Jl Sci Lit, vol 1 (1835), pp89-100.  
  18. Conybeare, W D, [Review of Agassiz 1833-1844, vol. 4], West of England Jl Sci Lit, vol 1 (1835), pp250-253. 
  19. Conybeare, W D et al, Ten plates comprising a plan, sections, and views, representing the changes produced on the coast of East Devon, between Axmouth and Lyme Regis by the subsidence of the land and elevation of the bottom of the sea, on the 26th December, 1839, and 3rd of February, 1840. London: John Murray (1840). 
  20. Cuvier, G, Discours sur les révolutions de la surface du globe, et sur les changemens qu'elles ont produits dans le règne animal. Paris: Chez G. Dufour et Ed. d'Ocagne (1826). 
  21. De la Beche, H T and W D Conybeare, “Notice of the discovery of a new Fossil Animal, forming a link between the Ichthyosaurus and Crocodile, together with general remarks on the Osteology of the Ichthyosaurus”, Transactions of the Geological Society of London, vol 5 (1821), pp559-594. 
  22. De la Beche, H T, “Remarks on the Geology of the South Coast of England, from Bridport Harbour, Dorset, to Babbacombe Bay, Devon”, Transactions of the Geological Society of London, Series 2, vol 1, (1822), pp40-47. 
  23. De la Beche, H T, Geological map of the environs of Lyme Regis [Dorset, England]. Lyme Regis: F Dunster (1826). 
  24. De la Beche, H T, Presidential Address, Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society, vol 4 (1848), ppxxiv-xxv. 
  25. Evans, M, “The roles played by museums, collections and collectors in the early history of reptile palaeontology”, Geological Society, London, Special Publications, vol 343 (2010), pp5-29.  
  26. Gordon, E O, The life and correspondence of William Buckland, DD, FRS, sometime Dean of Westminster, twice President of the Geological Society and first President of the British Association. New York: D Appleton & Co (1894). 
  27. Haile, N, “Buckland, William”, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 25 September 2014. 
  28. Hawkins, T, Memoirs of Ichthyosauri and Plesiosauri, extinct monsters of the ancient earth, with twenty-eight plates, copied from specimens in the author's collection of fossil organic remains. London: Published by Relfe and Fletcher (1834). 
  29. Hawkins, T and British Museum, The book of the great sea-dragons, Ichthyosauri and Plesiosauri ... gedolim taninim, of Moses. Extinct monsters of the ancient earth. With thirty plates, copied from skeletons in the author's collection of fossil organic remains, (deposited in the British Museum). London: William Pickering (1840). 
  30. Herries Davies, G L, Whatever is under the Earth’, London: Geological Society (2007). 
  31. Home, E, “Some account of the fossil remains of an animal move nearly allied to fishes than any of the other classes of animals”, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, vol 104 (1814), pp571-577. 
  32. Home, E, “Some farther account of the fossil remains of an animal, of which a description was given to the Royal Society in 1814”. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, vol 106 (1816). 1816, pp318-321. 
  33. Home, E, "Additional Facts Respecting the Fossil Remains of an Animal, on the Subject of Which Two Papers Have Been Printed in the Philosophical Transactions, Showing That the Bones of the Sternum Resemble Those of the Ornithorhynchus Paradoxus", Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, vol 108, (1818), pp24-32. 
  34. Home, E, "An account of the fossil skeleton of the Proteosaurus", Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, vol 109, (1819), pp209-211. 
  35. Home, E, “Reasons for giving the name Proteo-Saurus to the fossil skeleton which has been described”, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, vol 109, (1819), 212-216. 
  36. Howe, S R & T Sharpe and H S Torrens, Ichthyosaurs: a history of fossil ‘sea dragons’, Cardiff: National Museum of Wales (1981). 
  37. James, K W, “‘Damned nonsense!’: the geological career of the Third Earl of Enniskillen (1807‐1886), Geology Today, vol 2 (1986), pp184-185. 
  38. Lang, W D, “The geology of the Charmouth Cliffs, beach and fore- shore", Proceedings of the Geologists' Association, vol 25 (1914). 
  39. Lang, W D, “Mary Anning Fossilist”, Proceedings of the Geologists' Association, vol 47 (1936), pp65-67.  
  40. Lang, W D, “Mary Anning(1799-1847) and the pioneer geologists of Lyme”, Dorset Proceedings, vol 60 (1939), pp142-164. 
  41. Lang, W D, “Three letters by Mary Anning ‘fossilist’ of Lyme,” Dorset Proceedings, vol 66 (1945), pp169-173.  
  42. Lindley, J and W Hutton, The Fossil Flora of Great Britain; or figures and descriptions of the vegetable remains found in a fossil state in this country, part II. Ridgeway, London (1833-1835). 
  43. Lord, A R (ed), Davis, P (ed) and Palaeontological Association, Fossils from the Lower Lias of the Dorset coast. London: Palaeontological Association (Field guides to fossils, 13) (2010). 
  44. Lydekker, R, Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History). Part II (1889). 
  45. Martill, D M, “The early history of pterosaur discovery in Great Britain”, Geological Society, London, Special Publications, vol 343 (2010), pp287-311. 
  46. Martill, D M, "Dimorphodon and the Reverend George Howman's noctivagous flying dragon: the earliest restoration of a pterosaur in its natural habitat", Proceedings of the Geologists' Association, vol 125 (2014), pp120-130. 
  47. Owen, R, ‘Report on British Fossil Reptiles, Part 1.’ Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science [9th Meeting, 1839], (1840), pp43-126.  
  48. Owen, R, Monograph of the Fossil Reptilia of the Liassic Formations. Monograph of the Palaeontographical Society. Vol 35 (1881), pp83-134.  
  49. Owen, R & S D Sherborn and T H Huxley, The life of Richard Owen. London: John Murray (1894). 
  50. Parliament, House of Commons. Select Committee on the British Museum. 'Report from the Select Committee on the condition, management and affairs of the Brititsh Museum', Hansard (1835). 
  51. Patterson, C, “The phylogeny of the Chimaeroids”, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, B249 (1965), pp101-219. 
  52. Pidgeon, E & G Cuvier, The fossil remains of the animal kingdom. London: Whittaker, Treacher, & Co (1830). 
  53. Riley, H, “On a fossil in the Bristol Museum, and discovered in the Lias of Lyme Regis”, Proceedings of the Geological Society of London, vol 1 (1833), pp483-484.  
  54. Riley, H "On the Squaloraia", 'Transactions of the Geological Society of London', Series 2, vol 5 (1837), pp83-88. 
  55. Sharpe, T, ‘The Fossil Woman. A life of Mary Anning. Dorset: Dovecote Press (2019). 
  56. Vincent, P & P Taquet, et al, “Mary Anning's legacy to French vertebrate palaeontology”, Geological Magazine, vol 151 (2014), pp7-20. 
  57. Taylor, M A, “The plesiosaur’s birthplace: the Bristol Institution and its contribution to vertebrate palaeontology”, Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, vol 112 (1994), pp179-196. 
  58. Taylor, M A, “Thomas Hawkins”, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 23 September 2004. 
  59. Taylor, M A, “Rediscovery of an Ichthyosaurus breviceps Owen, 1881 sold by Mary Anning (1799-1847) to the surgeon Astley Cooper (1768-1841) and figured by William Buckland (1784-1856) in his Bridgewater Treatise”, Geoscience in South-West England, vol 13 (2014), pp321-327. 
  60. Torrens, H S “Mary Anning (1799-1847) of Lyme; ‘the greatest fossilist the world ever knew’”, BJHS, vol 28 (2005), pp257-284. 
  61. Torrens, H S “Anning, Mary”, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 3 January 2008. 
  62. Torrens, H S “Conybeare, William Daniel”, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 10 October 2019.